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Dreamers Not Criminals Formatted

The End of a Dream

Oregon’s Students and Higher Education Staff Deal with the Trump Administration’s Decision to Cancel the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program

Ppg Feature 5 Cover2

Innovation in Action

A Lebanon ESP Lands an OEA Promising Practices Grant and Transforms her Students’ Education

Newsflash

  • With OEA's Help, School Board Election Results Reveal Influx of New Faces

    With OEA's Help, School Board Election Results Reveal Influx of New Faces

    The year 2017 has ushered in a record-breaking number of Oregonians running for local school board positions that have been long uncontested. It has been nearly ten years since the Oregon School Boards Association has seen this many people – over 1,000 – campaign for office.
    OEA endorsed candidates in 86 local elections across the state. Over $30,000 was contributed on behalf of OEA members, which allowed community supporters to mobilize and reach more potential voters. Thousands of phone calls, emails, and doors knocks made a clear impact in many of these races as well.
    Over 75 percent of OEA-supported contenders were chosen by their communities to represent their school districts, including many candidates of color. As diversity increases in Oregon schools, cultural representation in school government is crucial to the success of all students. OEA proudly supports those who want to improve the overall quality of public education.

  • Loosened restrictions on nutrition content in school meals as childhood obesity soars

    Loosened restrictions on nutrition content in school meals as childhood obesity soars

    Newly appointed Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue has signed a proclamation that gives more flexibility on school meal guidelines, rolling back some of the regulations that were put into place under Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign. 
    Perdue cites “feedback from students, schools, and food service experts about the challenges they are facing in meeting final regulations for school meals” as a reason for the rollback; schools facing hardship in meeting nutrition goals are now able to serve foods with higher sodium and fat contents, enriched white flour, and low-fat flavored milks, the latter of which has been proven to include more sugar than recommended for an entire day. 
    This news comes at a time when over 30 percent of school-aged children in the United States are classified as overweight or obese. With many elementary schools pressed for funding to give students access to physical education, they are not only losing access to adequate exercise, but access to information about healthy food choices. 

  • Federal Court rules in favor of new, racially divisive school district in Alabama

    Federal Court rules in favor of new, racially divisive school district in Alabama

    Jefferson County, Alabama’s history is plagued with racial inequality. Though the area-school district has been under federal desegregation orders since 1965, a new federal court ruling may allow certain schools to roll back time to the pre-Civil Rights era. 
    Gardendale, a pre-dominantly white municipal in northern Jefferson County, has been granted the right to form their own school district within the city limits at the start of the next school year. This limits the number of students of color who can access programs unique to Gardendale schools. 
    The city has been fighting for local control of schools since 2013, with officials making the argument that the split will “give the community a sense of pride and ownership”. 
    The most recent report published by the U.S. Government Accountability Office shows that roughly 17 percent of schools are racial and/or socioeconomically isolated, which means that at least 75 percent of the student population is of the same race or socioeconomic group. An appeal to the case is being prepared for filing with the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals.

  • National Center for Education Statistics releases 2017 report

    National Center for Education Statistics releases 2017 report

    The Condition of Education is a congressionally mandated report prepared by NCES, based on the most recent available data.
    Some of the national highlights from the 2017 report:

    • Starting salary for those who have obtained a bachelor’s degree increased by just $100 from 2014 to 2015.
    • 300,000 fewer people enrolled in undergraduate programs from 2014 to 2015.
    • The average student/teacher ratio was 16:1 for the 2014-15 school year. 
    • The number of dropouts fell by .7 percent from 2015 to 2016.
    For more national education statistics, view the report here: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/...