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2018 OEA/NEA POSITIONS OPEN FOR NOMINATION & ELECTION

The following positions are open for nomination for the 2018 elections:ELECTED AT OEA RA:Region I...

2018 OEA/NEA POSITIONS OPEN FOR NOMINATION & ELECTION

The following positions are open for nomination for the 2018 elections:

ELECTED AT OEA RA:
Region I Vice President:
1 position for a 2- year term
Region II Vice President: 
1 position for a 2-year term
Region III Vice President: 
1 position for a 2-year term
Education Support Professional Director:
1 position for a 3-year term
NEA Director:
1 position for a 3-year term 

(term begins September 1, 2018)

ELECTED BY MAIL BALLOT:
State Delegates to the NEA RA
13 positions:
Region I: 
6 positions for a 3-year term;
Region II: 
4 positions for a 3-year term;
Region III:  
3 positions for a 3-year term.
(The number of delegates per region may be adjusted as the number of members within the region dictates as indicated by the January-February NEA membership report.)

OEA BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
9 positions for 3-year terms in Board Districts:
03b (Scott), 04 (Scruggs), 05 (Leaton), 07 (Overley), 10a (Collins), 
14 (Nelson), 17 (Jacobs), 18 (Calkins), 26a (Stauffer)

5 positions for a 1-year term in Board Districts:
06 (Marshall), 20b (Nordstrom), 
08 (Scott), 12 (Lathim), 19 (Todd)
(italics = not eligible for re-election)

SAT Report: Testing for success?

College Board has released their annual report for SAT participation in the graduating class of...

SAT Report: Testing for success?

College Board has released their annual report for SAT participation in the graduating class of 2017, but this year’s results are somewhat complicated. In 2014, the exam was comprised of math, writing, and reading sections, with a total possible score of 2400. The 2016 SAT kept math separate, but combined the reading and writing portion, giving test-takers a possible score of 1600. The conversion tables provided by College Board to aid college admissions offices in analyzing test scores from both old and new versions of the test have been less than helpful. Jennifer Winge, dean of admissions at Wooster College in Ohio says, “frankly, the whole process just pushed us further into our consideration of going test-optional.” 

#takeaknee

Peaceful protesting against police brutality and the unjust killing of innocent Americans, a topic...

#takeaknee

Peaceful protesting against police brutality and the unjust killing of innocent Americans, a topic of major contention in the NFL, has begun to spread through the ranks of high school athletes across the country. In Oregon, there have been numerous reports of students participating in the protest by kneeling during the performance of the National Anthem, a practice that began during the start of the 2016-17 NFL season. High school football coaches across Oregon have spoken out about their policies regarding students who wish to participate in the protest of the National Anthem; many have said that they will support their players’ right to kneel, but some had a requirement that students explain their reasoning first. Eric Mahlum, of Liberty High School in Hillsboro says, “I’m a big believer in the kids understanding why they do something, not just doing it…they would have to write me a paper before I would consider what to do.” Randy Heath, of Grant High School in Portland, is taking this opportunity to continue the work that Grant has accomplished with their Race Forward program, “We currently have players that take a knee…just as we did last year. It is part of an ongoing discussion at Grant High School. It has not been divisive.” 

Study: Educator diversity has impact on students of color

In March 2017, The Institute of Labor Economics released a study titled “The Long-Run Impacts of...

Study: Educator diversity has impact on students of color

In March 2017, The Institute of Labor Economics released a study titled “The Long-Run Impacts of Same-Race Teachers”, in which the authors studied the long-term academic records of over 100,000 elementary-aged black students in North Carolina and Tennessee. Their goal was to determine a) if they were in at least one class taught by a black teacher, and b) if they graduated high school.  The results are astounding. In the case of black males coming from low-income families, the high school dropout rate was decreased by 39 percent when they were exposed to just one black teacher in elementary school. These students were also more likely to sit for the SAT or ACT. 
Nicholas Papageorge, one of the authors of the study, states that hiring more black teachers would be the best long-term option to combat low graduation rates in black student populations, but he also says that short-term solutions would make a huge difference. What Papageorge suggests to schools in the interim is simple: make sure that every black student has contact with at least one black teacher before they exit elementary school.  “We could push around rosters tomorrow, change the way we assign kids [to classrooms], and have some effects next school year, not 10 years from now,” says Papageorge. For many students of color, having a single educator who looks like them, especially at a young age, can make a serious impact on the way they look at their future academic potential. 

Students in Coos Bay learn skills to avoid hefty (tuition) bills

As the need for skilled tradespeople borders at near-crisis levels, one high school is making sure...

Students in Coos Bay learn skills to avoid hefty (tuition) bills

As the need for skilled tradespeople borders at near-crisis levels, one high school is making sure their students can transition from the classroom directly into the workforce — and make a livable wage while they’re at it. Marshfield High School’s Career Technical Education (CTE) program allows students to graduate high school with experience in welding, fabrication, or CNC mechanics. This can translate into a  good-paying job after graduation, without taking the traditional college route, which can be cost-prohibitive to many students. 
Marshfield’s CTE instructor Glen Crook takes a hands-off approach to his classes in that he allows the students to problem-solve for themselves once he has given adequate instruction. Students in the program must take a year-long introductory course to learn to read and create blueprints before they can move on to the more advanced levels. “The idea is to give them as much real-world experience as possible,” Crook says. “If someone comes to our department with a project, I want these students to be able to know how to build it or pass it on to our welding or fabrication team if it's beyond their skill level. This way they also learn real world solutions.” 
There is a shortage of these skilled workers in the United States, to the tune of six million unfilled positions. The average age of a journeyman welder is 55, and fewer than 20 percent are under 35. “What's happening is that students are told to go to college to be successful when that's not [always] the case,” Crook says. “There are a lot of jobs out there where you make a lot of money with a certificate.” Crook is currently working with Southwestern Oregon Community College to offer his students college credit for those who stick with the program throughout their four years in high school.

Aloha High School students receive the gift of connectivity

Over 5 million families who have children in high school do not have internet access at home. Most...

Aloha High School students receive the gift of connectivity

Over 5 million families who have children in high school do not have internet access at home. Most high school teachers assign some form of online homework, which means that internet access is no longer an indulgence ­— it is a necessity for student success. Sprint plans to help bridge the gap for low-income students through their 1Million Project. They have pledged to provide one million high school students with a free smartphone, tablet, or hotspot device, along with 3 gigabytes per month of high-speed internet access for up to four years. 
Applications for the program were accepted until April 2017, and Aloha High School was selected to participate. On Sept. 15, Aloha hosted a press conference with Sprint to announce their partnership in the program. Students received their devices with free wireless service, and Principal Ken Yarnell addressed the student body stating that the event was “a celebration of [their] commitment to equity and excellence."

Educators sound off: How has student loan debt affected your quality of life?

In a recent survey conducted by NPR Ed, over 2,000 educators were asked about their level of worry...

Educators sound off: How has student loan debt affected your quality of life?

In a recent survey conducted by NPR Ed, over 2,000 educators were asked about their level of worry about their student loan debt. Among respondents, 56 percent said that they were moderately to extremely concerned; many said it is a main cause of stress and anxiety in their daily lives. With the cost of higher education rising each year, and the salaries of teachers growing at a much slower rate, some educators are questioning whether they will ever get out of debt. The threat of losing the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program is yet another thing troubling educators who have been diligently making payments, with the promise that there would be a light at the end of the tunnel. 
OEA wants to know: How has being in student loan debt changed your life? We want to hear from educators who are willing to share their stories about living with student loan debt. If you would like to be part of this project, contact webadmin@oregoned.org.

OEA Members Protest Betsy DeVos's Visit to McMinnville High School

On Oct. 11, 2017, more than 200 educators and students picketed the arrival of U.S. Secretary of...

OEA Members Protest Betsy DeVos's Visit to McMinnville High School

On Oct. 11, 2017, more than 200 educators and students picketed the arrival of U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos at McMinnville High School.
DeVos, who has long championed the use of standardized test scores as a measure for school accountability, was observing classroom practices in McMinnville School District, whose state test scores are among the highest in Oregon. 
However, the visit was marked more by the dissenting views expressed outside school grounds, than it was by the visit inside the halls of McMinnville High School. 
McMinnvile EA President Joe Crafton looked forward to having his fellow members showcase their unique teaching practices. “As I listened to Sec. DeVos at the end of her visit, it became clear this visit was just for show. Even before leaving the school, she was back to her usual lines about school vouchers. It felt like she did not hear anything the teachers or students told her."
"If DeVos really wanted to help students improve, she would look at schools like McMinnville and invest in educational practices that make a difference," Crafton said.

Milkwaukie's Roberto Aguilar Named Counselor of the Year

The Oregon School Counselor Association has named Roberto Aguilar, counselor at Milwaukie High...

Milkwaukie's Roberto Aguilar Named Counselor of the Year

The Oregon School Counselor Association has named Roberto Aguilar, counselor at Milwaukie High School, as its state school counselor of the year for 2017-18. Aguilar has been a strong proponent of Milwaukie’s pro-graduation environment, and has worked diligently to close the achievement gap for MHS’ Hispanic Students.
Aguilar coordinates the Padres Latino Mustang parent group, in which he shares information with Latino parents about college requirements and planning. He also oversees a rigorous two-year mentoring program for 10 diverse students at MHS each year. The program allows each student to access up to $6,000 in financial aid for college.  
In an article in the Clackamas Review, Aguilar said, "I want everyone supporting the decision and commitment to go to college."

Stronger Unions, Stronger Communities

Today, union members continue to negotiate for better wages and conditions that have a ripple...

Stronger Unions, Stronger Communities

Today, union members continue to negotiate for better wages and conditions that have a ripple effect in local economies. Through collective bargaining, union members are scoring victories that help entire communities – like safer nurse staffing levels and smaller classroom sizes that help students. 
A new joint report by NEA, AFT, AFSCME and SEIU looks at case studies in which strong unions have led to positive outcomes for the communities they serve. Read the full report online: www.afscme.org/news/publications/body/AFSCME-Strong-Unions-Stronger-Communities.pdf.
Together with community partners, unions are also using their collective voice to advocate for policies that benefit all working people and putting their resources to provide communities with direct support – like making sure children have access to counselors or ensuring that training is available for good jobs. 
Put simply: When unions are strong, communities are stronger.